5. Strasbourg 1905

In 1791, after an absence of four centuries, Jews were again allowed to settle in Strasbourg. During the Black Death in the fourteenth century they had been lynched and expelled, as they were believed to have poisoned the wells. The French Revolution rehabilitated the Jews and Napoleon regulated their worship. In the Rhenish provinces, however, various restrictions remained in force. Not until 1830, when the July Revolution gave France a constitutional monarchy, did the Jews of Strasbourg enjoy social and religious equality.

During the Franco-Prussian war of 1870 the city suffered heavy bombing. After the Prussian victory Strasbourg, as the capital of Alsace-Lorraine, became part of the new German Empire. The city was rebuilt on a more impressive scale and surrounded by massive fortifications. Strasbourg became an industrial centre, the population of which doubled in a few decades, and intellectual life flourished in the presence of new libraries and museums.

The Jewish community also profited from this development. In 1878 the Israelitisches Krankenhaus (Israelite Hospital) was built (top row, third section from the left, and there bottom left). Old synagogues had become too small and in 1899 the imposing Great Synagogue rose on the Kleber Staden (second row from top, second section from the left, and there on the right). From this period thousands of plans exist in which Jewish monuments and names form a recognizable, though modest part of the city. Many Jews in the diaspora did want to be such a minority.

Plan der Stadt Strassburg aufgestellt nach dem amtlichen Bebauungsplan, Strasbourg n.d. (± 1905)

Plan der Stadt Strassburg aufgestellt nach dem amtlichen Bebauungsplan, Strasbourg n.d. (± 1905)