7. Jews in Poland 1870-1910

This rare atlas of Poland was compiled before the resurgence of an independent Poland in 1918. The small map on the left with an overview of the distribution of the Jews is based on censuses and calculations from Austria, Prussia, Courland, Lithuania, Ruthenia and Congress Poland. The colours blue, through yellow, ochre and brown, to red circles represent the percentage of Jews in the total population: from areas with fewer than 5% to districts with more than 20%.

The small map on the right shows the shifts in the proportion of Jews in the total population in the decades before 1910. In regions in which they had never been numerous, such as Prussia, the Jews disappeared almost completely. Areas in which the percentage has increased are often major road intersections, such as those in North West Lithuania. It is obvious from concentrations at the borders that few Jews were intending to settle there permanently. These concentrations can be found, for instance, on the River Bug, between the Congress Poland and Lithuania and Ruthenia and on the border with Silesia between the Congress Poland and Prussia. The picture given by this map points to a phased ‘exodus’. Migration began in the west in 1870 and not until 25 years later in the east.

The Jews, National displacements, Jews in 1910 and Jews in the years 1870, 1897 and 1910. From : Romer, E. von (Red.), Geographisch-statistischer Atlas von Polen, Warszawa & Krakow 1916

The Jews, National displacements, Jews in 1910 and Jews in the years 1870, 1897 and 1910. From : Romer, E. von (Red.), Geographisch-statistischer Atlas von Polen, Warszawa & Krakow 1916